Leonard Cohen电玩城现金捕鱼 – Thanks for the Dance

Leonard Cohen – Thanks for the Dance (4 stars)

  • David Pollock
  • 30 November 2019

Leonard Cohen – Thanks for the Dance

  • Share on Twitter

  • Share on Facebook

  • Share on Pinterest

  • Share via email

Posthumous album from the poet and singer is sombre, contemplative and hopeful

In the advance press release for this fifteenth album – and first posthumous record – by rock music’s most sexually-charged renaissance gentleman, a beautiful idea is presented; that with its release, Leonard Cohen has had the final word over death. Thanks for the Dance is no hastily-assembled cuts package of whatever could be found around the studio, but a selection of songs which Cohen was at work on when he died in 2016, and which have been finished off by his son and latter-day musical collaborator Adam.

Just as David Bowie’s Blackstar charted Bowie’s knowledge of his own death in a manner which rocked expectations and made it his best and most acclaimed album in decades, so too did Cohen’s outstanding final album (or so we thought) You Want It Darker offer an apparently definitive statement on his own mortality and legacy in the months before his death. To listen to Thanks for the Dance is a different experience to both of the above; an album for the later stages of grief, and a path towards acceptance that when a death occurs, it means that somebody once lived.

Adam Cohen describes this record as ‘a continuation’ of the last, although Thanks for the Dance bears more of what捕鱼注册立即送现金 might be termed ‘celebrity guests’ than any other Leonard Cohen album, with Beck appearing on Jew’s harp, and backing vocals including those of Leslie Feist, Jennifer Warnes, Damian Rice and the Staves’ Jessica Staveley-Taylor. Yet all are subtle and unobtrusive; this is an album on which the music, whether sombre or hopeful, stays out of the way and lets the focus remain on Cohen’s voice and lyrics.

In ‘Happens to the Heart’ he muses upon the emotional implications of courtship, affairs and the act of creation (‘…I never called it art / it was just some old convention, like the horse before the cart’); amid the intimate, husky-voiced ‘Moving On’, a wry epilogue to a lovers’ split might be interpreted as the farewell of death; and amid the tense, lower-key strum of ‘The Night of Santiago’ is one final, heated growl of a sexual fantasy/reminiscence in which ‘the night surrenders to a daffodil machete’ and Cohen/his narrator pledges, ‘ You were born to judge the world / forgive me but I wasn’t.’

The title track is another farewell to a lover and to life, this one in a romantic waltz time, and the thread which Cohen keeps coming back to throughout the album – or which the younger Cohen has drawn out – tells us two things; that the end of an affair as metaphor for the end of a life is a potent one, and that final days bring ever-more potent memories of love. Or perhaps that only happens if you’re Leonard Cohen, but there’s much that universally resonates in this record’s unflinching portrayal of mortality.

‘The Goal’ is short and bittersweet, a snapshot of elder life where ‘the neighbour returns my smile of defeat’ and the only life lesson is ‘the goal falls short of the reach’, while ‘The Hills’ is a painkiller-anaesthetised slow waltz towards the end, which briefly rises upon the hope that a new birth – perhaps a child or a grandchild – will carry on his work. Sandwiched between these is ‘Puppets’, as mournful and bitter as any takedown of those with political power ever written by Cohen, which makes explicit reference to the horror of the Holocaust.

Almost the entirety of the record is subdued and contemplative, but there’s more darkness and desperation in the second half compared to the reminiscing of the first, leavened only by the ambient closing mantra ‘Listen to the Hummingbird’ and its implicit recognition that Cohen’s life has been spent channelling the emotion and wonder of the world around him. ‘Listen to the mind of God,’ he implores. ‘Listen to the hummingbird / don’t listen to me.’ If there is no more where this came from, then at least every last drop was sublime.

Thanks for the Dance is out now on Columbia.

The Pussycat Dolls: Five nostalgia-laden tracks we want to hear o宝博现金李逵捕鱼n the 2020 tour

The Pussycat Dolls: Five nostalgia-laden tracks we want to hear on the 2020 tour

  • The List
  • 30 November 2019

The Pussycat Dolls: five nostalgia-laden tracks we want to hear on their 2020 tour

  • Share on Twitter

  • Share on Facebook

  • Share on Pinterest

  • Share via email

The Dolls are set for a series of huge pop comeback shows, here’s how to get tickets

The Pussycat Dolls confirmed rumours of a reunion tour earlier this week, and to prove to the world they’ve still got it, they’ll appear on The X Factor tonight (Sat 30 Nov) to get fans excited for the 2020 tour. Though there is no sign of a presale, tickets for the Pussycat Doll’s 2020 UK tour go on sale at 10am on Sun 1 Dec.

The live shows will be the Dolls’ first UK tour in ten years, having last toured with the Doll Domination Tour in 2009. This means we’ve had ten years of no PCD, but soon we’ll be reintroduced of their many nostalgia-laden tracks, which will be making a comeback along with current members Nicole Scherzinger, Kimberley Wyatt, Ashley Roberts, Melody Thornton and Jessica Sutta.

Tickets for The Pussycat Dolls go on sale at 10am on Sun 1 Dec. Here are a list of their top five hits, guilty pleasures and all, that we’d like to see the Pussycat Dolls perform on their 2020 UK tour.

The Pussycat Dolls 2020 UK tour dates:
Mo2017现金捕鱼提现n 6 Apr – Motorpoint Arena, Cardiff
Wed 8 Apr – Arena, Birmingham
Thu 9 Apr – Motorpoint Arena, Nottingham
Sat 11 Apr – The SSE Hydro, Glasgow
Sun 12 Apr – Utilita Arena, Newcastle
Tue 14 Apr – Manchester Arena, Manchester
Wed 15 Apr – First Direct Arena, Leeds
Fri 17 Apr – The O2, London

Coldplay – Everyday Life – Chris Martin and co. take on themes of politic6现金捕鱼游戏s, climate change, racism and more on their eighth studio album

Coldplay – Everyday Life (3 stars)

  • David Pollock
  • 30 November 2019

Coldplay – Everyday Life

  • Share on Twitter

  • Share on Facebook

  • Share on Pinterest

  • Share via email

Chris Martin and co. take on themes of politics, climate change, racism and more on their eighth studio album

Spread across a double album which reveals itself to be essentially two discrete albums (named Sunrise and Sunset, respective最新现金捕鱼棋牌ly), launched with a sunrise show broadcast to the world from Amman in Jordan, and trailed by the – extremely laudable – decision to discontinue touring until a more environmentally sustainable means of doing so can be achieved, Coldplay’s eighth album has arrived with all the gravitas of a personal state-of-the-world address.

If that’s what this is, however, it will have to be accompanied by an increase in the band’s own personal currency as interlocutors of their times; for, amid a roster of artists who have managed to marry mountainous global popularity with a cannily era-defining edge, Coldplay have a way to go before they’re U2, let alone Bob Dylan, David Bowie or Joni Mitchell. In fact, that’s been their great skill across the years – marrying affirmative anthemic might to lyrics which do, and often mean, very little.

Aidan O’Rourke: ‘I really quickly fell in love with his succinct星辰现金捕鱼棋牌下载 way of getting a message or a feeling across in just 365 words’

Aidan O’Rourke: ‘I really quickly fell i捕鱼现金棋牌室n love with his succinct way of getting a message or a feeling across in just 365 words’

  • Kate Walker
  • 29 November 2019

Aidan O'Rourke: 'I really quickly fell in love with his succinct way of getting a message or a feeling across in just 365 words'

credit: Genevieve Stevenson

  • Share on Twitter

  • Share on Facebook

  • Share on Pinterest

  • Share via email

Folk musician discusses his collaboration with leading Scottish author James Robertson, which weaves 365 stories and tunes to create 365: Stories + Music

Aidan O’Rourke received a copy of James Robertson’s 365 Stories for Christmas in 2015. After reading a story every day from 1 January, he challenged himself to respond with his own musical writing cycle. ‘I met James in February, and I said “James, as of March the 1st I’m thinking of writing a tune in response to these stories every day, until I’ve got 365 tunes.” His first response was “don’t be daft,” and his wife was there going “no don’t do it!”‘

But O’Rourke embarked on this epic compositional task, finding time to write whilst touring, snatching his daily meditative writing moment whenever he could. When O’Rourke talks of Robertson’s stories, it’s clear that their musicality grabs him. ‘I thought he wrote these amazingly vivid, sweeping Scottish stories. I really quickly fell in love with the form, fell in love with his succinct way of getting a message or a feeling across in just 365 words.’

What began as a completely personal project soon began to snowball, with the collaboration of arranger Kit Downes adding a new layer to the rolling cycle. ‘Kit asked if I had any tunes that we could work on, and I said “well, I do actually!” At that point I had like, 183 tunes to share or something. He was the first person who ever played any of them with me. James has now come on board and we’ve got a show we do with Kit on harmonium and piano, and we weave music around his stories. At the start of this project I didn’t know Kit, I didn’t know James, and now we’ve got this kind of really deep relationship between the three of us, and it’s quite beautiful.’

10 unmissabl2019最新捕鱼赢现金e events happening in Edinburgh and Glasgow this December

10 unmissable events happening in Edinburgh and Glasgow this December

  • The List
  • 29 November 2019

10 unmissable events happening in Edinburgh and Glasgow this December

Scottish Ballet: The Snow Queen / credit: Nicola Selby and Eve McConnachie

  • Share on Twitter

  • Share on Facebook

  • Share on Pinterest

  • Share via email

Highlights include Counterflows, The Lion King and Scottish Ballet: The Snow Queen

Scottish Ballet: The Snow Queen

With typically stylish aplomb, Christopher Hampson choreographs a fresh take on the Hans Christian Andersen folk-tale, dubbing it as ‘Hansel and Gretel in the snow’. The eponymous character might still be a mean piece of work, but in this production we are given an empathic glimpse into what might have made her that way. And, of course, it looks amazing, thanks to Lez Brotherston’s set and costume design.
Festival Theatre, Edinburgh, Sat 7–Sun 29 Dec; Theatre Royal, Glasgow, Fri 3–Sat 18 Jan.

Counterflows

Glasgow will still host this important underground festival next April, but Edinburgh gets a taste of the Counterflows action with three separate gigs led by Beatrice Dillon, Usurper, and Joe McPhee with Decoy.
Queen’s Hall, Edinburgh, Sat 2 Nov, Fri 20 Dec, Fri 31 Jan.

Hal Fischer

Documenting the gay culture of 1970s San Francisco, photographer Hal Fischer was embedded in that scene, which gave his lens a truthful, sharing power as he embarked on a semiotic study.
Gallery of Modern Art, Glasgow, Fri 15 Nov–Sat 30 May.

The Lion King

The Disney spectacular created by Julie Taymor shows little sign of letting its grip go on the global consciousness, and Simba and co are back for another musical extravaganza.
Edinburgh Playhouse, Thu 5 Dec–Sun 29 Mar.

Hogmanay

Another year is about to dawn and that means celebrating like there’s no tomorrow. In Edinburgh, that means seeing a galaxy of stars such as Marc Almond, Mark Ronson and Dick & Dom.
Various venues, nationwide, Tue 31 Dec.

I Can Go Anywhere

Directed by Eve Nicol and written by Douglas Maxwell, this bold drama focuses on the relationship between an ageing academic and a troubled asylum seeker with an intriguing backdrop of mod culture.
Traverse Theatre, Edinburgh, Sat 7–21 Dec.

Marriage Story

Noah Baumbach majestically directs Scarlett Johansson and Adam Driver in an emotional piledriver which pulls no punches on the messy and traumatic business of divorce.
Selected release from Fri 15 Nov, Netflix from Fri 6 Dec.

The MacKinnon Collection

Scottish life and identity from the 1840s all the way through to the 1940s is represented in an evocative collection of photography.
Scottish National Portrait Gallery, Edinburgh, Sat 16 Nov–Sun 16 Feb.

MagicFest

The tenth instalment of the conjuring event formerly known as the Edinburgh International Magic Festival promises many tricks up sleeves including an opening gala with Colin Cloud, Chloe Crawford and Kevin Quantum.
Various venues, Edinburgh, Fri 27 Dec–Sun 5 Jan.

Tim Burton’s Nightmare Before Christmas

(Chosen by actor and playwright Johnny McKnight)
OK, how can this not be a hot ticket? It’s got literally everything going for it to be the ideal Christmas treat. An award-winning score by Danny Elfman played by our very own RSNO? Check. A live reading from comedy great Catherine O’Hara (I’ve my fingers crossed she’s got a selection of her wigs from Schit828棋牌捕鱼送现金t’s Creek to wear throughout the show)? Check. A Monday night performance: the one day off I have from panto? CHECK! And with only two shows in the whole of the UK (London being the other date) it makes it a rare treat in Glasgow. Aye, it might be strange singing ‘This Is Halloween’ after Halloween but that’s just yet another reason to make this show absolutely unmissable.
Cinderfella, Tron Theatre, Glasgow, Wed 27 Nov–5 Jan; Tim Burton’s Nightmare Before Christmas, SSE Hydro, Glasgow, Mon 2 Dec.

Celebrity lineup revealed for Strictly Come Dancing – The Live To捕鱼平台能玩现金吗ur

Celebrity lineup revealed for Strictly Come Dancing – The Live Tour

  • Becki Crossley
  • 11 November 2019

Celebrity lineup revealed for Strictly Come Dancing – The Live Tour

  • Share on Twitter

  • Share on Facebook

  • Share on Pinterest

  • Share via email

Catherine Tyldesley, Emma Barton, Mike Bushell, Kelvin Fletcher, Alex Scott and more take to the road in 2020

Strictly Come Dancing – The Live Tour heads to seven UK cities from January 2020. The all-star lineup for the touring production of the popular BBC s捕鱼游戏送50元现金how has been announced. Alongside the professional dancers, contestants Catherine Tyldesley, Emma Barton, Saffron Barker, Mike Bushell, Kelvin Fletcher, Alex Scott and Karim Zeroual will perform next year with former Strictly champion Stacey Dooley hosting the shows.

Judges for the 2020 live tour include Shirley Ballas, Craig Revel Horwood and Bruno Tonioli, who will appear in Birmingham, Aberdeen, Leeds, Manchester, Glasgow, Nottingham and London.

Strictly Come Dancing – The Live Tour 2020 dates:
Thu 16–Sun 19 Jan – Arena Birmingham
Tue 21–Wed 22 Jan – P&J Live, Aberdeen
Fri 24 Jan – First Direct Arena, Leeds
Sat 25–Sun 26 Jan – Manchester Arena
Sat 1–Sun 2 Feb – The SSE Hydro, Glasgow
Tue 4–Wed 5 Feb – Motorpoint Arena, Nottingham
Fri 7–Sun 9 Feb – The O2, London

Tickets for all Strictly Come Dancing – The Live Tour dates are available now.

Priscilla:能赚现金提现的捕鱼游戏 Queen of the Desert

Priscilla: Queen of the Desert (4 stars)

  • Anahit Behrooz
  • 11 November 2019

Priscilla: Queen of the Desert

credit: Darren Bell

  • Share on Twitter

  • Share on Facebook

  • Share on Pinterest

  • Share via email

Celebrating its 25th birthday, Priscilla: Queen of the Desert proves it still has mileage to spare

The UK revival of a successful Australian stage musical, itself an adaptation of the Stephan Elliott-written and directed film, Priscilla: Queen of the Desert has been through as many transformations as its drag queen protagonists, but just like them, it still knows how to put on a show.

Telling the story of two drag queens and a transgender woman who road trip across the Australian desert,现金单机捕鱼ios版下载 this production is as unflinchingly flamboyant as it is touching. The three leads are infinitely likeable: Joe McFadden plays Tick with winning charm, Nick Hayes dazzles as the young, swaggering Felicia, but it is Miles Western – playing the sharp-witted yet tender Bernadette – who steals the show, playing the role with a sincerity that allows Bernadette’s experience as a transwoman to shine even amidst the glitter and sequins.

These, incidentally, are aplenty: this is a show that is unabashedly loud in colour, song, and sparkles, embodying pride in every set piece and list. The only false note throughout is the uncomfortably racialised and sexualised character of Cynthia – a townsman’s Asian wife – who spends an entire song shooting ping pong balls from unseen places. A product of an earlier time, perhaps, the stereotype nevertheless feel out of place in a show otherwise so insistent on inclusion and understanding. This misstep aside, however, Priscilla: Queen of the Desert is an irresistibly riotous and moving experience. Indeed, as the debate surrounding gender identity rages on in the media and politics, the show’s emphasis on fluidity and acceptance is as crucial as ever.

Reviewed at Edinburgh Playhouse. Liverpool Empire, Mon 11–Sat 16 Nov, and touring.

Good With People – David Harrower two hander pushes the right but现金捕鱼游戏注册送分电脑版tons

Good With People (4 stars)

  • Lorna Irvine
  • 11 捕鱼达人现金版November 2019

Good With People

  • Share on Twitter

  • Share on Facebook

  • Share on Pinterest

  • Share via email

David Harrower two hander pushes the right buttons

No one, arguably, in Scottish theatre, creates tension quite like playwright David Harrower. This bone dry comedy deals in his very specific themes: class, education and the way the past has a tendency to sneak in uninvited into present-day interactions.

But where his controversial Blackbird had an uncomfortable older man / younger girl relationship at its core, the focus here is on older landlady Helen (Louise Ludgate) owner of a shabby Helensburgh hotel and mysterious younger guest Evan (Daniel Cahill), just returned from voluntary nursing in war zones.

Immediately, it becomes clear that the two aren’t in fact strangers, but there is unfinished business. Soon, the buttoned-up Helen expects accountability from her surly patron for past misdemeanours against her family, but Evan isn’t biting.

The shadow of Faslane naval base looms large, almost like a supporting character, and Rosa Duncan’s pinprick direction allows both Harrower’s elliptical language, and the uneasy sexual tension, to simmer.

Whether dissecting the breakdown of the nuclear family unit, or the problems with holding onto a small-town mentality, Harrower’s script has real weight, and the two brilliantly restrained performances here push all the right buttons.

Beacon Arts Centre, Greenock, Tue 12 Nov–Sat 16 Nov.

The Boo现金捕鱼小游戏k of Mormon set to run at the Edinburgh Playhouse from June 2020, get tickets

The Book of Mormon set to run at the Edinburgh Playhouse from June 2020, get tickets

  • Becki Crossley
  • 11 November 2019

The Book of Mormon set to run at the Edinburgh Playhouse from June 2020

  • Share on Twitter

  • Share on Facebook

  • Share on Pinterest

  • Share via email

The rumours were true, it’s finally coming! Find out how to get presale tickets and more

The Book of Mormon is set to run at the Edinburgh Playhouse from Wed 17 Jun–Sat 4 Jul 2020 as part of its national UK tour. Presale tickets for all dates are available to ATG Theatre Card members now ahead of the general sale at 10am on Wed 13 Nov.

The musical comedy was created by Trey Parker and Matt Stone (South Park) and Bobby Lopez (Avenue Q) and features over 20 original songs, including famed hits ‘Turn It Off’, ‘Hello’ and ‘I Believe’ among others. Since premiering in 2011 the show has smashed box office records, bagged nine Tony Awards including Best Musical and took home a Grammy Award for Best Musical Theatre Album.

For these reasons and so many more, Scotland has been waiting for the production to call at the capital’s 3,059 capacity venue following announced runs in Bristol, Birmingham, Cardiff and more.

The satirical musical tells the story of two Mormon missionaries who travel from Salt Lake City to share the teachings of their religion with a remote Ugandan community. The show has sold-out venues on Broadway, in London捕鱼大师1比1现金版, across North America, Melbourne and Sydney and will no doubt do the same in Scotland.

The show runs at Edinburgh Playhouse as part of the theatre’s 2020 programme, during which the venue hosts back-to-back smash-hit musicals like The Lion King, Heathers, Once, Footloose and more.

The Book of Mormon runs at the Edinburgh Playhouse from Wed 17 Jun–Sat 4 Jul 2020. Presale tickets are available to ATG Theatre Card holders now. General sale begins at 10am on Wed 13 Nov.

Cabaret – Not quite enough of the darkness, or the 信誉平台真钱捕鱼light

Cabaret (3 stars)

  • Gareth K Vile
  • 11 November 2019

Cabaret

  • Share on Twitter

  • Share on Facebook

  • Share on Pinterest

  • Share via email

Not quite enough of the darkness, or the light

Rufus Norris’ direction of Cabaret relies heavily on the power of the script’s development of the Nazi threat to the German Weimar Republic and its more familiar musical numbers: the finale is an abrupt adoption of a suggestive theatricality that has more in common with performance art than musical theatre, and ends the show with a brutal, bleak tableau. That the plot descends from the decadent optimism of the first act to an increasingly violent and paranoid state, and the scenes set inside Berlin’s nightclub evoke the rise of Nazism allow Norris to develop a striking production despite a dramaturgy that appears to drag out conversations and banter into a self-conscious, measured and tragic tone.

The plot follows both the romance between Clifford Bradshaw and Sally Bowles (Charles Hagerty and Kara Lily Hayworth, who show very little chemistry), and a parallel relationship between their landlady and a Jewish grocer (which foregrounds the rise of anti-Semitism), while the decline of the Weimar Republic is explored through the scenes at the Kit-Kat club. John Partridge is disappointing as the MC – replacing the character’s moral am现金捕鱼游戏机biguity with vagueness, and never presenting the necessary sinister edge as the Third Reich comes to dominate the decadent underworld. The first act feels pedestrian: concentrating on Bradshaw’s acclimatisation in Berlin, it lacks the energy of the second act, when the threats are embodied, the Jewish community is attacked and the queers start to disappear.

Norris does introduce a striking coup de theatre at the end of act one, and emphasises the underlying tensions through the scenography and frequently empty stage. While Javier de Frutos struggles in his choreography to add new life to the now over-familiar signifiers of Weimar decadence, Bowles’ ultimate loneliness and naivety is eloquently exposed in the final number – the more usually celebratory titular song. In places embracing the horror behind the glamour, this revival is uneven, unsure of how best to use its relevant themes and too cautious in its use of spectacle and glamour.

Reviewed at Edinburgh Festival Theatre. His Majesty’s Theatre, Aberdeen, Tue 12–Sat 16 Nov, and touring.